Cool Change operates near Kuraree,
a meeting place for Whadjuk Noongar Bibbulmun moort (family), brought together by ke-ning (corroboree) to share kaartdijin (knowledge).

We acknowledge that this is and always will be Aboriginal land, and that our capacity to engage in creative practice on this boodja is informed by the knowledge and labour of First Nations People.

– Place names retrieved from Gnarla Boodja Mili Mili

Cool Change Contemporary logo

About Us

Cool Change is an artist-run initiative based in Boorloo / Perth, Western Australia. Since our inception, we have hosted exhibitions, artist residences, performances, workshops, talks, and operated a small shop. Volunteer-led and not-for-profit, the organisation is committed to presenting critically engaged artistic practice in a welcoming and accessible environment with an agile and responsive outlook.

We are planning to recommence operations in 2023 both onsite and offsite. Two phrases signify our approach to recommencement:

Slow Roll

From what we have learnt over the last four years about volunteer-led arts organisations, a slow roll approach is needed to sustainably and strategically renew our operations. We need to remain responsive to changes and currents surrounding us, while also maintaining an agile structure that can adapt and bend to account for the needs of the emerging and experimental practices that Cool Change is designed to support.

Cool Change should shrink and expand where needed, taking time to recoup, listen and breath as desired. To recommence at a slow roll pace is to account for the capacities of our volunteer team and those around us.

As Is

The nature of space and site is an important variable for arts organsations. As a collective, we are driven by a resourceful and responsible approach to space and site, which does not take for granted the opportunity to operate on the unceded lands of Whadjuk Noongar people, and recognising our place as settler artists and workers on this land.

What is the impact emerging volunteer arts organisations have had on property, community and inner-city lifestyle, and how has this impact been considered and remunerated by resourced and established businesses? This is an open question and a demand for the labour of emerging artists, writers, curators and workers to not be taken lightly. Cool Change is reconsidering the ubiquity of the white-cube and the impact this has had on potential for exhibition-based arts organisations to emerge.